All posts by Bob Bending

Ron Liptrot’s bikes

I am disposing of my Father’s effects after his death in June this year. Ron Liptrot was an active member, as you will know. He had four bikes which I would dearly like to adopt, but alas I live in a flat and have no space for them. So I will try and sell them. Two now remain.

Here are the details:

  1. Principia Rex – frame bought in 2000 by me and used maybe 5 times before I left to live abroad. It was rebuilt in 2012 (I think) with an Ultegra 10 speed groupset. Rims are open Pro.
  2. Roberts built tourer in FW Evan logo. Built with Chorus 8 speed group.  Rims Matrix.

All bikes are in working order. The Principia is as-new. The Raleigh is tatty and dirty. The Evans shows signs of use. The Land Rover will be of interest to boating enthusiasts as they can use it to anchor most craft. If you knew my Father you would know that under the grease and dirt is a perfectly working bike which will never, ever see corrosion.

I will ask for 250 quid for the Principia and 150 for the Evans.

We also have a garage full of bits and pieces, pumps, tools and so-on, and if anyone is interested I can let them nose around when I am next in the UK (early next month, I hope) and see if any of it is of use to them. Everything can be seen in Four Marks.

 

pliptrot@flexim.de

What if it gets stolen?

Immobilise is a national property ownership database whereby members of the public register their property through the website in the hope that if it is lost or stolen and comes into the hands of the police, their property will be returned to them. Immobilise is a police data base where items that have serial numbers can be logged.

Bike crime is particularly prevalent in Basingstoke and many of the bikes recovered by Police cannot be traced back to their owners.  Equally if we suspect that a person is in possession of a stolen bike we find it hard to prove unless the owner has registered the serial number on Immobilise.

More information can be found on the website  www.immobilise.com

Good home wanted…

I am trying to find a home for a cycle trailer.  It was made by an engineering student many years ago.  It is located here in Andover and as a CTC member thought that a member might give it a good home.  We are not talking money, but don’t want it scrapped!

Email for details

IMG_3982 IMG_3978 IMG_3981 IMG_3980

 

Cycle Basingstoke

PrintCycle Basingstoke is a new cycle campaign group. CTC members and anyone who supports cycling is welcome to Cycle Basingstoke. You can be a supporter, a volunteer or just have your say at our monthly campaign meetings.

Keep up-to-date with Cycle Basingstoke developments and read more about it on the dedicated page.

Shopping and Social Cycling Group

For beginners, returners, mums and old blokes.

On Friday mornings, a small group ride from Fleet, for about 45 minutes at a pace of the slowest, either to:

  1. Hartley Wintney W.I. weekly sale of cakes, jams, fruit etc.
  2. Froyle Village Hall
  3. Odiham Village Weekly Market

For coffee, tea, cake or biscuits (as available), then a 45 minute return ride. Slow and easy!

Start 9.30 and back by midday. Meeting and finish at 127 Crookham Road, Fleet. GU51 5SA. Junction with Coxheath Road (close to canal bridge).

Any bicycle, no fancy clothing, long pants and trouser clips. Ladies get bonus points for handlebar cane shopping baskets!  You can do it! we promise.

Details from: Jack; Fleet 01252 612565 or Dave; Odiham 01256 704493

Cycle routes to nowhere…

…or cycle routes to Accident and Emergency?

Why we need SPACE FOR CYCLING

Many motorists cannot understand why cyclists do not use cycle routes. Well, most cycle routes, unlike the M3 or the M4, go nowhere, they may end on the edge of a field, in the middle of a wood, half way along a street or just short of a busy junction or roundabout.

What about the cycle routes which do go somewhere? Well, caveat emptor, or in plain English, “user beware” or you could experience a painful tumble.

Last winter I was foolish enough to go on the cycle path instead of the adjacent pavement for pedestrians (there was no road for motors). A cyclist suddenly appeared round a blind corner, there was nowhere to go other than into a solid wall, we tangled handlebars and I ended up in casualty unable to use my hands or hold cycle handlebars for three months. As I say, I should have known better, as my husband was thrown off his tandem negotiating a hidden obstacle in the middle of the cyclepath. He was unable to walk or cycle for weeks and eventually had a knee operation.   My friend in Aldershot is a cycle trainer and should have known better than to use an 18 inch wide cycle lane, she was caught between kerb and parked cars with nowhere to go and was invisible to a car turning across her path, she was run over and had her leg broken. If she had used the wider pavement or even the road she would no doubt have been accused of contributory negligence. “Fortunately she was wearing a helmet” you might say, but how that is meant to prevent a broken leg or prevent the accident in the first place I have no idea. Then too no amount of yellow clothing will make you visible through a solid wall or behind parked cars.

The message is clear, cycle paths which are poorly designed or go nowhere are DANGEROUS and should not be built let alone used. What we need is SPACE FOR CYCLING and the courage to spend the necessary MONEY. Holland, the modern utopia for cycling despite having more cars per head than in Britain, was once just like Britain with few cyclists and nowhere to cycle. The Dutch had the courage and the will to spend money on well designed infrastructure with lots of space for cycling.   We need to do the same instead of buying a few metres of cycle path here and there from housing developers.

The Local Plan is up for final consultation, lot of new housing but nothing for cycling – just a few more shoddy cycle paths.

If you want to join the Basingstoke local cycle campaign group contact Heather Rainbow

heather@rainbowramsey.plus.com or phone 0758 3336879